New Students - Bridging Assignments - Wilmington Grammar Sixth Form

New Students - Bridging Assignments

ART

Sixth Form Induction – WG6

SUBJECT

ART & DESIGN: Fine Art and Textiles

In this subject you will be expected to:

Use creative skills and formal elements to give visual form to individual thoughts, feelings observations and ideas.  You should show evidence of trying to extend your own and others’ ways of seeing the world.  You must use the visual language of the subject sensitively and thoughtfully to support your intentions.  The course will include painting and drawing, , photography, printmaking, sculpture and alternative media. You will use a variety of methods of recording, researching and developing ideas, keeping a sketchbook, relating work to artists and designers and creating final pieces in your chosen area of study.

You will need to have an interest in:

A variety of media and approaches in Fine Art.  Looking at and responding to art and design practise in the world around you.

Independent learning in this subject requires: (5hrs of independent study)

Practical work – drawing, painting, taking photographs, and/or exploring textile media

Research – observed, internet, visiting galleries

Sketchbook presentation, Written responses and annotation

Watching Film and TV documentaries  

Suggested Activities

Visit exhibitions and galleries.

Keep a diary of inspirational and visual images.

Experiment with different media

Examples of Independent Study tasks:

Using an Artist’s artwork write an analysis and respond with a painting.

Internet research on the theme and relevant Artists

Research and produce a set of drawings on a theme

Use of a variety of media to produce art work

Preparation of resources for the next lesson.

Take a set of photographs in response to an artist

Watch a documentary about an artist, designer, style, culture or art movement

Present work in a sketchbook

Future Career aspirations linked to this subject are:

The art and design industries are an integral part of the modern world and cover a huge range of areas; from magazine covers to furniture almost everything you own has been designed in some form or fashion.

Animation and illustration, Arts heritage, conservation and restoration, book arts production, calligraphy and typography, designers, architecture, fashion textiles and costume, graphic design, web design, photography, product design, prop and set design, spatial, interior and landscape design are some of the many roles available in this industry.

There are many associated careers where art is useful including teaching, therapy and medical professions, media and filmmaking, events management.

Induction

Task

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Success Criteria

Respond to the theme of “INSIDE/OUTSIDE” showing ability to explore and research independently, make a creative and practical response to artists, designers, cultures and styles.

  1. Choose an Artist/Designer that interests you from this list:
  • Georgia O'Keeffe,
  • Frida Kahlo still life,
  • Bonnard windows,
  • Leonardo Da Vinci bones,
  • Hammershoi interiors,
  • Henri Moore sculptures
  1. Research your chosen Artist.  Using the Internet, carry out thorough research into the Artist/Designer.  Produce a minimum of an A4 page of written information about them.
  2. Analyse. Produce a minimum of an A4 page of analysis of the piece you that you have chosen to inspire your task.  This should include an analysis of the content and your own thoughts about it.
  3. Explore. Take photographs, print out 4 of your photographs and produce 3 pieces using a variety of media and techniques to explore your ideas.
  4. Respond.  Produce a response in any media to the Artist/Designer’s work based on your exploration.
  5. Evaluate.  Produce a written evaluation of the success of your work.
  6. Present.  Present all of your work professionally for submission in September.  This may be mounted on sheets, or in a small sketchbook or folder.

Your work will be marked using the AS assessment objectives

AO1 DevelopFinding out about famous art and using this to inspire your own work

AO2 ExperimentExperimenting with media and techniques and improving your skills and visual ideas so you can devise a final idea

AO3 Record:  Exploring your ideas, drawing, making observations and collecting resource materials

AO4 Present:  Completing a relevant and personal final piece inspired by an artist

Deadline

First Art/Textile lesson in September

 

 

Houshiary-Induction-Task.pdfInduction-Task-Impressionism.pdfInduction-Task-Richard-Hamilton.pdf

Further information and Grayson Perry Task as below

Sonia Delaunay

“Sonia Delaunay (1885–1979) was a key figure in the Parisian avant-garde and became the European doyenne of abstract art.  Throughout the first half of the twentieth century, she celebrated the modern world of movement, technology and urban life, exploring new ideas about colour theory together with her husband Robert Delaunay.”

Sonia Delaunay, Prismes electriques 1914 “Sonia Delaunay was a multi-disciplinary abstract artist and key figure in the Parisian avant-garde. Alongside her husband, Robert Delaunay, she pioneered the movement Simultanism. Her exploration of the interaction between colours has created a sense of depth and movement throughout her oeuvre.

 

 

 

“Simultanism is the strand of Orphism practised by the Delaunays. The name comes from the work of French scientist Michel Eugène Chevreul who identified the phenomenon of ‘simultaneous contrast’, in which colours look different depending on the colours around them. For example, a grey will look lighter on a dark background than it does on a light one. The Delaunays dispensed with form and aimed to created rhythm, motion and depth through overlapping patches of vibrant hues.”    http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/ey-exhibition-sonia-delaunay/delaunay-introduction

There is always a major exhibition of great C20th abstract painter’s work at Tate Modern.  Carry out the relevant research as detailed on the cover page of this booklet then produce an abstract painting that explores colour relationships and how the juxtaposition of different colours changes the impact they have on the viewer.

Begin by making small plans using coloured pencil or watercolour.  Then when you have decided on your best version you can produce the large scale painting.

Sonia Delaunay Electric Prisms 1913     Sonia Delaunay Syncopated rhythm, so-called The Black Snake 1967     Sonia Delaunay Simultaneous Dresses (The three women) 1925

http://www.artfund.org/assets/art-news/2014/grayson-interview/grayson-interview-1536.jpg

 

GRAYSON PERRY:    WHO ARE YOU?

http://www.artfund.org/assets/art-news/2014/grayson-map/grayson-map-1.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Map of Days isn't a typical self-portrait. How did you first settle on the idea of doing a map?

Well, I've done several other maps. I like maps. So when I was planning the show at the National Portrait Gallery, as well as the portraits of the people that are in the TV series, I wanted to do a self-portrait as well. So I sought a metaphor. I wanted to make it more of a musing on the nature of identity and the self.  I thought the walled city was a good metaphor – the wall, I suppose, can roughly be interpreted as your skin.  But like any city, it's dependent on the landscape it sits in as well.

That is the nature of the self – our identity only works in company.  It’s co-created by other people as much as ourselves, so that was the idea behind it.  And it's a nice vehicle for jotting down things as they come into my head, practically.  That's how I work, on the whole – I don’t overly plan my pieces because I want them to have a random authenticity, I suppose.”

http://www.artfund.org/news/2014/10/31/grayson-perry-interview-map-of-days

Turner Prize-winning artist Grayson Perry turned his attention to portraiture and British identity for a display of works at the National Portrait Gallery, including a self-portrait and a tapestry, made during his Channel 4 series Who Are You?

Fourteen portraits of individuals, families and groups, including politician Chris Huhne, a young female-to-male transsexual, Northern Ireland Loyalist marchers and X-Factor contestant Rylan Clark, were inserted into the Gallery’s nineteenth and twentieth century rooms on Floor 1.

Grayson Perry: Who Are You? is a series of three sixty-minute programmes that were broadcast last year on Channel 4.   You can still watch all three episodes on Channel 4 On Demand.

Watch at least the first episode all the way through before embarking on any practical work.  Then follow the instructions on the cover sheet of this booklet.

Then, plan and produce EITHER a self-portrait OR a portrait of someone you know very well, using an unconventional method of representation.

 

BIOLOGY

A Level Bridging Assignment - BIOLOGY

SUBJECT

                                                    BIOLOGY

In this subject you will be expected to:

Be self-motivated and responsible for your own learning – you should use your own time to ensure your notes are complete and up to date, without prompting from your teacher.  All homework should be completed on time.

Develop good practical skills – including a methodical and organised approach to practical work, attention to detail and an ability to analyse data effectively.

Have high level literacy skills – This is essential to success in this course.  You should keep a glossary of key words, use scientific terms accurately, structure essay questions logically and describe processes in a high level of detail.

You will need to have an interest in:

Human anatomy, human physiology, biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, plant anatomy, plant physiology, ecology, environmental biology, respiration, photosynthesis, homeostasis

Independent learning in this subject requires: (5hrs of independent study).

Using your text book and other resources to make your own notes in addition to those made in class

Practising examination questions and using mark schemes to self-assess your progress

Taking responsibility for your own progress and seeking help when needed

Ensuring that all homework is completed on time and to the best of your ability.  Seeking help if needed in plenty of time to allow the task to be completed by the deadline.   

Keeping up with practical endorsement work to ensure you get a pass

Taking an interest in current developments in Biology and extending your reading outside of the limitations of the specification

Suggested reading List:

 

OCR A Level biology A Student books 1 and 2 (published by Pearson)

OCR A Level Biology A (published by Oxford)

OCR A level biology A revision guides

Biological Sciences Review (Can access for free online, but can also subscribe to hard copy)

Useful Websites:

http://ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce-biology-a-h020-h420-from-2015/ (for specification and resources)

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/ - A great resource for genetics from the University of Utah

http://www.cellsalive.com/ - An interactive website detailing cell structure and microscopy

http://www.biozone.co.uk/biolinks/ - Links to websites covering a range of Biological topic

Examples of Independent Study tasks:

Essay writing, exam questions, research tasks, planning of practical work, note-taking

Information on Controlled Assessment  deadlines if applicable –

There are no longer controlled assessments for A level Biology, however, there is a separate qualification called the A level biology practical endorsement. This is a simple pass or fail. Most universities will require a pass for entrance to their courses. It consists of a series of practicals over the two year course that comprise different skills. Failure to complete the practicals, or the write ups, can lead to a fail.

Future Career aspirations linked to this subject are:

There are many careers directly linked to Biology including medicine, dentistry, clinical sciences, research, pharmaceuticals, environmental scientist, conservation, science writing, sports science, physiotherapy and teaching.

Many employers value the analytical skills and attention to detail developed by a scientific training and will favour Science graduates even if the subject content of their degree is not required for the job.

Biology students from WG6 have successfully gone on to study medicine, dentistry, vet science, biochemistry, biological science, biomedical science, biology, zoology, conservation, ecology and environment science

Detail of Bridging Assignment  including  Success Criteria

 

To complete independent study based on cell ultrastructure to learn for a test in the first 2 weeks back. Task 2 document is as below link

 

Module 1 Cells – part 1: Cell structure Induction Material

We are learning to.......

Covered in induction task ü

Revised ü

Understanding

Explain the difference between magnification and resolution

 

 

 

State the resolution and magnification that can be achieved by a:

  • light microscope
  • transmission electron microscope
  • scanning electron microscope.

 

 

 

Explain why samples may require staining for light and electron microscopy.

 

 

 

Describe the advantages and disadvantages of obtaining images using a: light microscope, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope.

 

 

 

How to calculate the magnification /actual size of an image.

 

 

 

Recognise the following structures from diagrams and electron microscope images:

  • nucleus
  • nucleolus
  • nuclear envelope
  • rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum
  • golgi apparatus
  • ribosomes
  • mitochondria
  • lysosomes
  • chloroplasts
  • plasma (cell surface) membrane
  • centrioles
  • flagella and cilia

 

 

 

Describe the function of the structures listed above.

 

 

 

 

 

Deadline

First lesson in September and Class Assessment will follow in September.

 

 

Biology-Induction-task-2018.pdf

BUSINESS STUDIES

CHEMISTRY

COMPUTER SCIENCE

DESIGN, ENGINEER, CONSTRUCT (DEC)

ECONOMICS

ELECTRONICS

The Electronics induction task can be downloaded from the below link.  Further information can be accessed here

A-Level-Electronics-Induction-Task.pdf

ENGLISH

EPQ

A Level Bridging Assignment

 

Subject

           Extended Project Qualification

In this subject you will be expected to:

Independently select a high level question, hypothesis or brief to respond to in the form of a dissertation, investigation, performance or artefact. You will then select the type of project from these options. You are assessed on one piece of work that you will work on throughout the year. There are no exams. Effective research is crucial to the success of the project to ensure that you examine your title comprehensively and critically from every perspective. In addition, you will also keep an activity log as a record of your progression and decision making. Time management will be absolutely crucial as you draw together your research to form a final report that is expertly structured and presented with precision. You will also present your project orally at the end of the project. Final written reports tend to be between 5,000 and 10,000 words depending on the nature of the project. However, there is no word limit. You will be assessed on your management of the project, your use of resources, the development of the project and your critical reflection and evaluation alongside the oral presentation.

You will need to have an interest in: writing, research, investigations and enquiries. In terms of content and topics, your project can cover almost anything as long as the title provides enough scope to achieve the highest mark.

Independent learning in this subject requires: (5hrs of independent study).

- This is by nature a very independent piece of work.

You will be expected to keep an activity log illustrating what you have done each week, the resources consulted and subsequent further investigations required.

Suggested reading list:

There are no specific texts given that the nature each topic is very different and unique. The initial starting point is to read around subjects that are of great interest to you. These can be related to your other areas of study, university course considerations or other areas of genuine interest outside of the curriculum. You should keep records of books and journals you have consulted.

Useful Websites:

Please refer to the Edexcel exam board website for comprehensive details of the course.

Additionally, you will find reputable articles, journals and periodicals by searching through ‘google scholar’ rather than normal google.

Information on Coursework deadlines if applicable – we expect students to complete the project by the middle of April 2019. The exact date will be given at the start of the year. This provides enough time to comprehensively research, critique and complete the project.

Future Career aspirations linked to this subject are: This qualification provides evidence of a wide range of transferable skills that compliment many employment sectors.

University hold the Extended Project in high regard as it provides excellent preparation for university level study. This includes evidence of independent management of time, resources and the production of a high calibre, critically reflective depth study. The Russell Group of universities welcome evidence of the Extended Project in UCAS applications.

Induction Task & Success Criteria

 

Please produce a written response to the hypothesis

 

“Grammar Schools promote social mobility” Discuss.

 

Further guidance and considerations are given on the Induction task sheet AS BELOW

Deadline

First lesson in September

 

EPQ-Bridging-Assessment-Task-2018.pdf.

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

A Level Bridging Assignment Wilmington Grammar 

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

A LEVEL

In this subject you will be expected to:

Core Pure 1 and 2 Papers and the Further Statistics 1 and Further Mechanics 1 Papers. Each of these papers will last 90 minutes and contribute 25% to the overall grade. All are calculator assessments to be sat at the end of the two years.

Recall, select and use their knowledge of mathematical facts, concepts and techniques in a variety of contexts.

Construct rigorous mathematical arguments and proofs through use of precise statements, logical deduction and inference and by the manipulation of mathematical expressions, including the construction of extended arguments for handling substantial problems presented in unstructured form.

Recall, select and use their knowledge of standard mathematical models to represent situations in the real world; recognise and understand given representations involving standard models; present and interpret results from such models in terms of the original situation, including discussion of the assumptions made and refinement of such models.

You will need to have an interest in:

The natural sciences, genuine interest in abstract mathematics, proofs, computational and numerical mathematics.

Independent learning in this subject requires: (5hrs of independent study).

Use of websites to revise questions by topics (see links below) to prepare for end of chapter tests.

Suggested reading List:

The textbooks needed for this course are:

Yr12 – Book 1/AS – Core Pure Mathematics (ISBN: 9781292183336)

           FS1 – Further Statistics 1 (ISBN: 9781292183374)

           FM1 – Further Mechanics 1 (ISBN: 9871292183312)

Yr13 – Book 2 – Core Pure Mathematics (ISBN: 9781292183343)

Useful Websites:

Past paper completion schedule will be in effect later in the year. Examination only course.


Information on Controlled Assessment  deadlines if applicable –

No controlled assessment, 100% exam based course.
 

Future Career aspirations linked to this subject are: Useful for applying for subjects at university that are STEM based (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), especially at Russell Group and Oxbridge Universities.
 

Detail of Bridging Assignment  including  Success Criteria

The below “Bridging Assignment” booklet will need to be completed. This is due the first lesson back. This bridging assignment is the same one required for the standard A-level in Mathematics.

You will be expected to achieve at least 70%.

 

 

Deadline

First lesson in September

 

Mathematics-Induction-Task.pdf

GEOGRAPHY

HISTORY

A Level Bridging Assignment 

HISTORY

                                                    A Level

 

In this subject you will be expected to:

•           Apply yourself – we, as a History department, will try all we can to help your son or daughter to be successful. However, this very much depends on how much they are willing to apply themselves to the topics and techniques which need to be perfected to achieve great results. Therefore maximum application is necessary.

•           Understand the topics fully – due to the time pressure of the exam, a poor understanding of the topics can lead to silly errors. Background reading and sufficient notes are essential so that students have enough knowledge and understanding to perform well in their examinations.

•           Practice your technique – ‘the harder you practice, the luckier you get’. It is essential that students complete sufficient past papers and essay questions to learn the technique of essay writing and source analysis. All work will be marked and graded by the department to aid improvement. Try to encourage your son or daughter to complete work under timed conditions to get used to the constraints and pressure of the exam.

•           Be independent – Application, Understanding and Practice will not be solely achieved through lesson and homework tasks alone.  Independent study is vital for success.

You will need to have an interest in:

Modern History, British, American and European Politics and reading & researching in depth.

Independent learning in this subject requires: (5hrs of independent study).

- Watching documentaries from You Tube to further your knowledge.

- Wider Reading of the main texts & other books recommended by teachers (see reading list below).

- Research projects into key events & individuals.

- Creating revision guides, podcasts or videos for use in the run up to examinations.

Suggested reading List:

Component 1 – The Tudors: England 1485-1603

•           C Lee, Britain, 1483-1529, Nelson Thornes, 2008 

•           I Dawson, The Tudor Century, Nelson Thornes, 1993

•           D Murphy (ed), England 1485-1603, Collins, 1999

•           N Fellows, Disorder and Rebellion in Tudor England, Hodder, 2009

•           R Lockyer & D O’Sullivan, Tudor Britain 1485-1603, Longman, 1993

•           K Randall, Henry VIII and the Government of England, Hodder, 2001

•           K Randall, Henry VIII and the Reformation in England, Hodder, 2001

Component 2 (WGSG) - Democracy and Nazism: Germany, 1918–1945

•           R Whitfield, Democracy and Nazism: Germany 1918-1945, Oxford University Press, 2015 (*Recommended to buy*)

•           M Collier, P Pedley, Heinemann Advanced History: Germany 1919-45, Heinemann, 2000 

•           J Hiden, The Weimar Republic (Seminar Studies In History), Routledge, 1996

•           Hinton and Hite, Weimar and Nazi Germany (SHP Advanced History Core Texts), Hodder, 2000

•           G Layton, Access to History: From Kaiser to Fuhrer: Germany 1900-1945, Hodder Education, 2009 

•           R Whitfield, AQA History AS Unit 2 Life in Nazi Germany, 1933-1945, Nelson Thornes, 2009

•           M Burleigh, The Third Reich: A New History, Pan, 2001

•           Sir I Kershaw, The 'Hitler Myth': Image and Reality in the Third Reich, Oxford Paperbacks, 2001 

•           A McElligott, Weimar Germany (Short Oxford History of Germany), OUP, 2009

•           L Rees, Auschwitz : The Nazis & The 'Final Solution’, BBC Books, 2005

•           L Rees, The Nazis: A Warning From History, BBC Books, 2006

Component 2 (WGSB) - The Cold War, c1945–1991

•           J Aldred, Aspects of International Relations, 1945 – 2004, Nelson Thornes, 2009

•           O Edwards, Access to History: The USA and the Cold War 1945-63, Hodder, 2002

•           S Phillips, The Cold War in Europe and Asia, Heineman, 2001

•           K Rogers and J Thomas, The Cold War, Pearson, 2008

•           D Williamson, Access to History: Europe and the Cold War 1945-1991, Hodder, 2006

•           R Croackatt, The Fifty Years War, Routledge, 1995

•           John Lewis Gaddis, The Cold War, Penguin, 2007

•           Isaacs and Downing, The Cold War: For Forty-five Years the World Held its Breath, Abacas, 2008

•           B Lightbody, The Cold War (Questions and Analysis in History), Routledge, 1999

•           J Mason, The Cold War: 1945-1991 (Lancaster Pamphlets), Routledge, 1996

Useful Websites:

•           www.johnguy.co.uk

•           www.history.ac.uk

•           www.activehistory.co.uk

•           www.bbc.co.uk/history

•           http://holocaustlearning.org/survivors   

•           http://spartacus-educational.com/GERweimar.htm  

•           http://weimarandnazigermany.co.uk/5-top-sites-find-primary-documents-weimargermany/#.U2vWs5FOWM8  

•           http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/weimar_germany.htm

•           http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/Nazi%20Germany.htm

•           http://www.ushmm.org/research/research-in-collections/search-thecollections/bibliography/primary-sources

•           http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/

•           http://www.wilsoncenter.org/program/cold-war-international-history-project

•           http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/coldwar.asp

•           http://www2.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/coldwar/documents/

•           http://millercenter.org/academic/dgs/primaryresources/cold_war

•           http://www.historywiz.com/primarysources/coldwarprimary.html

•           http://web.archive.org/web/20081217154418/http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/cold.war

Examples of Independent Study tasks:

There are plenty of excellent documentaries on YouTube concerning all the topics. Type into the search bar these following phrases to come across some documentaries that will further understanding and knowledge.

•           Kings and Queens of England: Episode 3: Tudors

•           Edward and Mary

•           Monarchy The Imperial King

•           Secrets of the Virgin Queen

•           The Nazis: A Warning from History

•           The Story of the Third Reich

•           Hitler in Colour

•           Cold War Documentary

•           Cold War From Allies to Enemies

•           Nuclear tipping point

In addition, there are many series and films that relate to these topics such as:

•           The Tudors

•           Downfall

•           Hitler: The Rise of Evil

•           Elizabeth and Elizabeth: The Golden Age

•           A Man for All Seasons

•           Monarch

•           Schindler’s List

•           The Reader

•           The Pianist

•           Dr Strangelove

•           13 Days

•           Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

•           Threads

•           WarGames

There are past papers that are on the school learning platform. I will be showing students where these are. They should aim to complete these essays under timed conditions, we will always be happy to mark extra work and give them feedback on where to improve.

A resource that the department has purchased is a subscription to the Historical Association. On the student area, students can read articles about the topics that have been published and listen to podcasts that have been produced about the topics. In addition, there are excellent ‘How to’ guides, mostly aimed at A-level students, such as ‘Surviving the leap from GCSE to AS level History’, ‘Taking notes at A-Level History’, and ‘Using Historical Sources’. The web address to go to is http://www.history.org.uk/resources/student.html, the username is 45895 and the password is coatheed52.

There are many podcasts that are available for students. They are easily found on Apple Podcasts, Podbean, or wherever you find your podcasts.  Two of the best are ‘History Rocks’ and ‘Versus History’.

Students are also encouraged to consult the magazine Modern History Review, for up to date articles on issues relating to the history of the USA (available in the school library).

Aiming for A*/A grade: Those students aiming at an A*/A grade in History should acquire copies of the recommended texts (above) for use in lessons, planning and writing of essay’s, wider reading & revision as well as using the suggested web links and video links listed. The more comprehensive your level of knowledge and understanding the more likely you can achieve highly in the subject.

Information on Controlled Assessment  deadlines if applicable –

Coursework is worth 20% of the overall A-Level. The coursework is a 3000-3500 assignment that is completed over the course of Year 12 and 13. This will require a large amount of research of both contemporary sources and historians’ interpretations to construct a cohesive and convincing argument to a question of the student’s choice.

Future Career aspirations linked to this subject are:

The amount of university courses and careers that a History A-Level opens to you is vast. As a respected subject, universities embrace History for all types of courses, from medicine to art. The course demonstrates how you can research, critically analyse, communicate and come to judgments, all aspects vital in jobs and university courses. In terms of careers, many students take History as a route into law, but it could lead to opportunities in retail, management, journalism, presenting, banking, accountancy, ICT, economist, politics, diplomacy, the armed forces, the police, the civil service, teaching, lecturing, sales, advertising, counselling, social work, youth work and care services, as well as many others.

Detail of Bridging Assignment  including  Success Criteria

 

Please see attached assignment below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deadline

First lesson in September and Class Assessment will follow in September.

 

History-Tudor-bridging-assignment-2018.pdf

MATHEMATICS

A Level Bridging Assignment Wilmington Grammar  

SUBJECT

    Mathematics  A Level

In this subject you will be expected to:

You will study Pure Mathematics, Statistics and Mechanics.  You will sit three papers all of equal weighting and all 2 hours.  Papers 1 & 2 will cover the Pure Mathematics content and Paper 3 will cover both Statistics and Mechanics.

You will need to have an interest in:

Solving mathematical problems and enjoy the challenges of studying Mathematics at this level.  You must have a positive attitude and be prepared to work consistently.  As well as being an intellectually stimulating subject in its own right, AS/A2 Mathematics will equip you with the necessary skills of problem solving, logic and clear thinking to support many other subjects.

Independent learning in this subject requires: (5hrs of independent study).

The ability to show resilience and perseverance when solving complex problems. You will need to be prepared to take risks and learn from any mistakes you make.  It is vital that you organise your time so that you can spend additional time practising new concepts. As well as completing set homework tasks it is suggested that you purchase additional revision guides. You will be encouraged to develop your communication skills through discussions with your peers.

Suggested reading List:

The textbooks needed for this course are:

Yr12 – Year 1/AS – Pure Mathematics (ISBN:  9781292183398)

Yr12 – Year 1/AS – Statistics and Mechanics (ISBN:  9781292183282)

Yr13 – Year 2 – Pure Mathematics (ISBN:  9781292183403)

Yr13 – Year 2 – Statistics and Mechanics (ISBN:  9781446944073)

Useful Websites:

Using websites for extra practice and revision.

Completing mixed exercises for each of the Core chapters.

Completing the review exercises in Statistics and Mechanics.

Practising past examination questions.

Information on Controlled Assessment  deadlines if applicable –

All modules will be taken in May/June.

There is no coursework in Mathematics.

Future Career aspirations linked to this subject are:

Recent research shows that people with A level Mathematics earn, on average, 10% more than those without.  An A level in Mathematics is the key to almost any opportunity.  It will allow you to continue with your studies in Mathematics or a Mathematics related degree subject. It will also give you the skills that many degree courses require for example Engineering, Finance, Banking, IT, Accountancy and Architecture to name a few.

Detail of Bridging Assignment  including  Success Criteria

 

The below “Bridging Assignment” booklet will need to be completed.

You will be expected to achieve at least 60%.

 

 

 

 

 

Deadline

First lesson in September and Class Assessment will follow in September.

 

Mathematics-Induction-Task.pdf

MEDIA

PERSONAL FINANCE

Personal Finance - Bridging Task Information

SUBJECT

 Financial Studies

In this subject you will be expected to:

Financial Studies is an Applied General qualification, with the ability to gain an AS level (CEFS) and to go on to a full A Level (DIPFS).  The objective is to enable students to make informed and confident decision regarding their finances, leading up to a wider understanding of the financial services industry.  It will develop independent thinking, critical analysis and evaluation, and requires excellent written communication.  It is an excellent grounding for undergraduate study of finance and business related courses, as well as apprenticeships and employment in the banking and finance sectors.

In Year 12 you will sit four exams to gain the CEFS (AS) qualification, made up of two separate Units comprising both a multiple choice paper plus a written paper based on a pre-released case study, with one opportunity to re-take to gain higher marks.  You need to pass each exam at the set minimum pass mark to progress on to the next exam.  DIPFS in Year 13 has the same four exams in two units, in the same format, and then each of the four units combine to make an overall A level grade (graded A* - E).

You will need to have an interest in:

Planning your personal finances by responsible borrowing and sensible saving; social-economic trends and the wider implications of debt on society.  You should also be interested in how global events impact consumers and the whole of the financial services industry.

Independent learning in this subject requires: (5hrs of independent study).

Students will be expected to read around the subject in their own time and will have access to all the course materials and a KnowledgeBank (virtual library) online at MyLIBF with your own personal login.  They should also keep up to date on Finance news, using such resources as BBC news (through any source), reading the Financial Times, Money Box, The Economist etc. 

Time at home should be spent reviewing and adding to class notes and practising past papers to test knowledge and exam technique, as well as completing the additional activities on the LIBF website

Suggested reading List:

Prior reading is not necessary before starting the course, but it would be helpful to add the BBC news app to your mobile phone and start to take an interest in Finance.

Useful Websites:

Ap – BBC News – and personalise through My News – Personal Fiannce, UK Economy, UK Banking   

Other websites will be recommended throughout the course.

Information on Controlled Assessment  deadlines if applicable –

There are no controlled assessments.  However, you should be aware that you will sit exams in January (resits in March), and again in April (resits early June).

Future Career aspirations linked to this subject are:

The financially related content of this qualification is excellent grounding for undergraduate study in finance and business related courses, with many students going on to study accounting, business, finance and banking.  The course content also appears in a number of Apprenticeship Frameworks that support the business and finance sectors.  The course itself does not qualify to direct entry to any particular occupational role, but DIPFS may support access to employment in insurance, banking, office administration or in the voluntary sector such as with Citizens Advice.

Detail of Bridging Assignment  including  Success Criteria

 

The Bridging assignment for Personal Finance can be downloaded from the link below on this page

 

This assignment is split into seven tasks, covering the skills you will require for this course, such as research, key words, mathematical skills.  Tasks 1 and 2 replicate the multiple choice and written questions you will find in the exams.  All the questions relate to year 12 subjects.

 

Deadline

All tasks to be completed and brought to the first lesson in September.

The mathematical and multiple choice tests will be peer marked in the first lesson in September and the written tasks will be taken in for marking.  The research tasks will taken in at the first lesson and will be used in the relevant lesson.


Personal-Finance-Task-2018.pdf

PHOTOGRAPHY

Sixth Form Induction – WG6

SUBJECT

PHOTOGRAPHY

In this subject you will be expected to:

 

Use creative skills to give visual form to your thoughts, feelings observations and ideas.  You should show evidence of trying to extend your own and others’ ways of seeing the world.  You must use the visual language of Photography sensitively and thoughtfully to support your intentions.  The course will include taking and manipulating photographs, a variety of methods of recording, researching and developing ideas, keeping a sketchbook, relating work to photographers, artists and using alternative media.

You will need to have an interest in:

Looking at and responding to the work of Photographers

Photography and Art & Design practice

Using a variety of media and approaches in Photography

Technical aspects of Photography and how to use a DSLR.

Independent learning in this subject requires: (5hrs of independent study)

Practical work – planning and taking photographs, manipulating and printing

Research – observed, internet, visiting galleries

Sketchbook presentation

Written responses and annotation

Watching Film and TV documentaries  

Suggested Activities

Visit exhibitions.

Keep Pinterest boards of inspirational images – arrange them into themes.

Take photos all the time with your smartphone when you don’t have your DSLR with you - open a separate Instagram account and upload images every day.  It becomes like a photographer’s ‘sketchbook’ of ideas.

 Examples of Independent Study tasks:

Using an Artist’s artwork write an analysis and respond with photographs.

Internet research on the theme and relevant photographers and artists

Research and produce a set of photographs on a theme

Use of a variety of approaches to produce photographs

Preparation of resources for the next lesson.

Take a set of photographs in response to an artist

Present work in a sketchbook

Watch a documentary about a Photographer, about culture or an art movement

Future Career aspirations linked to this subject are:

The art, design, photography and film making industries are an integral part of our modern world and cover an extensive range of areas.   Many Fine Artists use photography as their medium and this course is an excellent introduction to this practice.   Examples of careers in photography include fashion, general or social (weddings and portraits), advertising and editorial photography, press and photojournalism, corporate (company promotional material), scientific or medical – recording scientific research, or medical conditions and treatments. 

Photography AS level is also an excellent partner to Art & Design A level especially if you are planning to apply for Art College and pursuing a creative career.

Induction Task

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Choose just one of the photography worksheets included on this page.  Before you starting taking photographs, do the following:

 

  1. Research your chosen photographer.  Using the Internet, carry out thorough research into the photographer.  Produce a minimum of an A4 page of written information about them.
  2. Analyse. Produce a minimum of an A4 page of written analysis of a photograph or set of photographs by your chosen photographer.  This should include an analysis of the content of the photograph and your own thoughts about the photograph.  You should be familiar with this kind of analysis from your GCSE Art course
  3. Respond.  Produce your response to your chosen worksheet.
  4. Evaluate.  Produce a written evaluation of the success of your work.
  5. Present.  Present all of your work professionally for submission in September.  This may mounted on a sheet or number of sheets, or in a small sketchbook or portfolio.

Success Criteria

Your work will be marked using the AS assessment objectives

AO1 DevelopInvestigating  & analysing Photographers work and using this to inspire your own work

AO2 ExploreExploring different techniques and processes with your camera and refining these techniques so you can devise a final idea

AO3 Record:  Recording your ideas visually and in other forms, making notes, planning, explaining ideas, creatin drawing, making observations and collecting resource materials

AO4 Present:  Completing a relevant and personal photograph or set of photographs inspired by your chosen photographer.

Deadline

First Photography lesson in September

 

Guy-Bourdin-Induction-Task.pdf

Henri-Cartier-Bresson-Induction.pdf

Nan-Goldin-Induction-Sheet.pdf

Naoya-Hatakeyama.pdf

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PHYSICS

Level Bridging Assignment

 

SUBJECT

 Physics A Level

In this subject you will be expected to:

Physics is the most fundamental of Sciences. It aims to explore the topics of matter and energy in the world and how they are related. The A specification is designed to develop students interest in and enthusiasm for the subject, including developing an interest in further study and careers associated with Physics. The AS and A level are now stand alone qualifications which mean that students who chose A level Physics will not sit any exams until the end of year 13.

You will need to have an interest in:

How things in the physical world work and enjoy carrying out investigations by the application of problem solving

Independent learning in this subject requires: (5hrs of independent study).

Students will be expected to read around the subject in their own time. Journals such as the New Scientist and Physics World will help to improve their understanding of how the topics they are taught in class relate the world around them.

They will also be expected to spend time at home reading, reviewing and adding to their class notes and using the questions in the course textbook and from past papers to test their knowledge and exam technique.

Suggested reading List:

Students need to ensure that they have a firm knowledge of all the areas of Physics covered at GCSE. A GCSE textbook such as Physics for You is a good start.

CGP also publishes a book called Head start to AS which covers many of the topics that link the A level and GCSE courses.

Useful Websites:

www.physicsclassroom.org               

www.iop.org

www.school-for-champions.com/physics.htm                       

www.cyberphysics.co.uk

www.tap.iop.org                    

www.physics.org

Examples of Independent Study tasks:

Examples of research tasks set during the year are as follows:

How a capacitor is used in a defibrillator

How our view of the structure of the atom has changed over time

The evolution of a star

Information on Controlled Assessment  deadlines if applicable –

There are no controlled assessments for A level Physics. However, throughout the two years of the course students will complete a series of practical activities or PAGs. This is an on-going assessment and at the end of the course students will be awarded a pass or fail for this section alongside their A level grade.

Future Career aspirations linked to this subject are:

A good pass in A-level Physics is essential for entry into a degree in all high-technology courses such as electronics, materials science, astronomy and in all forms of engineering. It is also a requirement for those wishing to pursue a technical career in the Armed Forces and often preferred for studying Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary Science. The knowledge and skills acquired during the A-level course provide a sound background for many different non-scientific careers, such as Computing, Accountancy and other financially orientated careers

Detail of Bridging Assignment  including  Success Criteria

 

The Bridging assignment for Physics can be downloaded from this page (as below)

 

This assignment is split into three sections. The first part considers your mathematical skills at 40% of the A level Physics exams will test mathematical skills.

The second section is two sets of exam questions. One set on electricity and one set on forces. These are the first two topics taught in year 12 Physics and in your first lesson at the start of year 12 you will have a baseline test that covers these two topics.

 

Deadline

First lesson in September and Class Assessment will follow in September.

Physics-task.pdf.

POLITICS

PSYCHOLOGY

Extended Project Qualification AS Edexcel

Introduction to the course

The Extended Project requires students to create a single piece of work, requiring a high degree of planning, preparation and autonomous working.  The projects that students complete will differ by subject, but all will require persistence over time and research skills to explore a subject independently in real depth.

All projects must include a written report of approximately 5000 words. However, this will depend on the nature of the project undertaken. Students can complete their project as a dissertation, investigation, artefact or performance.  The project will conclude with a short presentation to a non-specialist audience.

All students will follow the EPQ programme with organised lectures and seminars.

The Extended Project is worth a maximum of 70 UCAS points, slightly more than an AS Level (60 points) as the A* grade is available for the Extended Project.

Course Content

Students may study any topic they wish; there is no requirement for students to study an area within the range of subjects offered at A Level. Students may wish to study a topic related to the subject that they intend to study at university or an area of specific interest.

Assessment

  • Completion of a detailed activity log
  • Written report
  • Short presentation of the process and the final project

Future Career Progression

The Extended Project is an excellent way to build up and develop excellent research skills while learning how to be more critical and analytical in evaluations. It presents a unique opportunity to examine a subject at considerable depth and uncover new interests whilst working towards a qualification.

Universities view the EPQ very positively. The EPQ gives students the opportunity to develop independent learning skills (e.g. project management, decision-making, problem-solving, planning, research, critical thinking) that are important at university but which are underdeveloped during A Level courses. Many universities will offer lower grades based on an excellent Extended Project result.

Psychology-Induction-Task.pdf

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

A Level Bridging Assignment - Religious Studies

SUBJECT

Religious Studies: Religion, Philosophy and Ethics A Level

In this subject you will be expected to:

1) develop your interest in and enthusiasm for a rigorous study of religion, philosophy and ethics and relate it to the wider world;

2) treat the subject as an academic discipline by developing knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to the specialist study of religion, philosophy and ethics.

3) adopt an enquiring, critical and reflective approach to the study of religion;

4) reflect on and develop your own values, opinions and attitudes in the light of your learning.

Content

Year 1

Philosophy – Origins of Philosophical thought; Existence of God; God and the world

Ethics – Four ethical theories; applied ethics – Business and Euthanasia

Religion – Human nature; Jesus and God; Christian moral action

Year 2

Philosophy – Religious language; Nature of God

Ethics – Ethical language; Conscience; applied ethics – sexual ethics

Religion – Pluralism; gender; challenges to religion

You will need to have an interest in: Religion, Philosophy, Ethics, Theology, Textual studies, Sociology, Psychology, Law, History and Biology.

Independent learning in this subject requires: (5hrs of independent study).

- Pre-learning

- Wider Reading of the main texts & other books recommended by teachers (see reading list below).

- Completing essay plans and practice essays.

- Research projects into key theories & individuals.

- Watching documentaries from You Tube to further your knowledge.

- Creating revision guides, podcasts or videos for use in the run up to examinations.

Suggested reading List:

Oxford a Level Religious Studies for OCR: AS and Year 1. Libby Ahluwalia

Oxford a Level Religious Studies for OCR: AS and Year 2. Libby Ahluwalia

OCR Religious Studies a Level Year 1 and AS. Campbell & Wilcockson

OCR Religious Studies a Level Year 1 and AS. Campbell & Wilcockson

Religion and Ethics for OCR: The Complete Resource for Component 02 of the New AS and A Level Specifications. Coffey

God Matters. Peter Vardy

Philosophy of Religion. Cole

The Moral Philosophers: An Introduction to Ethics.

Christianity – A Very Short Introduction.

Christian Theology. McGrath.

Ethical Theory (Access To Philosophy). Mel Thompson.

Ethical Studies. Robert Bowie. Nelson Thornes.

RS Review. Hodder Education.

Ethics Matters. Peter Vardy.

Sophie’s World. Jostein Gaarder.

Useful Websites:

https://philosophicalinvestigations.co.uk/ http://www.rsrevision.com/ http://plato.stanford.edu/ www.philosophybites.com www.teachphilosophy101.org The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast

Examples of Independent Study tasks:

Personal research into the beliefs surroundingJesus; his deity; his role as a liberator; his guidance

Information on Controlled Assessment  deadlines if applicable –

There is no coursework in this A Level.

Future Career aspirations linked to this subject are:

RS, Philosophy and Ethics teaches you skills of evaluation and analysis which are applicable to almost any walk of life. It is not just about what others think; it is about learning to think for yourself. According to AGCAS – the association of Graduate Careers Advisory Service, RS/Theology graduates go into a wide range of careers. However, they, and employers, feel that it particularly prepares students for the following careers:

Financial services, Legal sector (Law), Politics, Consultancy, Jour nalism, Education, Social care, community work.

And that’s not all. The skills you will develop will benefit you in any area involving working with other showing initiative thinking for yourself… that’s just about anything!

Detail of Bridging Assignment  including  Success Criteria

 

You need to answer the three questions below, each is based the question style on a paper in your A Level.

Your answers need to presented in a written form, and should be a maximum of 3 sides of A4 (1 side per question). Your answers should be supported by relevant and purposeful quotes from academic sources (not Wikipedia).  Your answer should show a knowledge of both sides of the argument. A success criteria is also provided below to give guidance relating to the skills being assessed.

Each question is worth 10 marks with half (5 marks) of these being for skills of knowledge and understanding (AO1) and the others (5 marks) being for skills of analysis and evaluation (AO2).

In all your responses, you should:

· demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief, including knowledge and understanding of religious thought and teaching

· approaches to the study of religion and belief.

· analyse and evaluate aspects of, and approaches to, religion and belief, including their significance, influence and study.

Answer the following THREE questions:

Question 1 – Philosophy

Assess the effectiveness of Aristotle’s four causes in explaining the world. (10 marks)

Recommended source – Gaarder, J. Sophie’s World – Chapter on Aristotle.

Question 2 – Ethics

Assess the view that Fletcher’s Situation Ethics gives no useful guidance for making moral decisions. (10 marks)

Recommended source – http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org.

Question 3 – Christian Thought and Developments

Critically assess Augustine’s teaching on Original Sin. (10 marks)

Recommended source - https://www.cliffsnotes.comSt Augustine’s Confessions (Chapters 6-7)

Your work will be assessed based on the following mark scheme.

 

AO1 – Knowledge and Understanding

Grade

Mark

Descriptors

 

 

A -  5

B -  4

C -  3

D – 2

E - 1

 

5

 

An excellent attempt to explain the relevant content showing understanding and engagement with the material; very high level of ability to select and deploy relevant information, accurate use of technical terms.
Communication: answer is well constructed and organised

 

4

A good attempt to address the question, accurate knowledge, good understanding, good selection of material, technical terms mostly accurate. Communication: generally clear and organised

 

3

A satisfactory attempt to address the question; some accurate knowledge, evidence of appropriate understanding, some successful selection of material, some accurate use of technical terms.

Communication: some clarity and organisation

 

AO2 – Analysis, evaluation and application

 

A - 5

B -  4

C - 3

D – 2

E - 1

5

An excellent attempt which uses a range of evidence to sustain an argument, comprehends the demands of the question, shows understanding and critical analysis of different viewpoints Communication: answer is well constructed and organised.

4

A good attempt at using evidence to sustain an argument, some successful and clear analysis, likely to put more than one point of view. Communication: generally clear and organised.

3

The argument is sustained and justified, some successful analysis which may be implicit through choice of material. Communication: some clarity and organisation.

 

If you are having problems with the task and need some advice please contact dwalters@wgsb.org.uk  or  sjwallace@wgsg.co.uk

 

Deadline

First lesson in September and Class Assessment will follow in September.

 

SOCIOLOGY